Teaching

Current Courses

FYS PLAN 59/ENGL 59 – Framing Public Policy

Researchers in the humanities and the social sciences tend to study public policy from different perspectives. In this class, we will examine public policy from the perspective of two disciplines: rhetoric and city and regional planning. Rhetoric scholars focus on the language stakeholders use to frame discussions of public policy, while planning researchers use methods such as interviews, case studies, and site visits to understand policy changes and how they affect individuals. By combining these methods, students in this course will develop a deeper understanding of public policy, understand how persuasive language shapes our understanding of those policies, and learn how to craft effective messages to enact change.
Syllabus

PLAN 769 – HCD Planning and Policy

This graduate course will explore issues of U.S. housing and community development policy and planning issues at the national, state, and local level in the United States. It will provide an overview of the historic and contemporary housing and community development planning and policy issues that have shaped households, neighborhoods, cities, and regions. This course will pay particular attention to the issues faced by housing practitioners and policy analysts in the struggle to insure that decent, affordable housing is available for all groups within society.
Syllabus

PLAN 823 – HCD Workshop

The Housing and Community Development Workshop is intended to provide
students with hands-on experience working on an applied planning project for a client. Teams comprised of 3-4 students are matched with clients based on a matching process that involves clients “pitching” their projects and students indicating their interests in the projects. In collaboration with the clients, student teams will develop a scope of work early on, identify tasks to be accomplished throughout the semester, and deliverables. Students are expected to draw from knowledge and skills from their prior planning courses and apply them to this project. Therefore, students will apply their knowledge of quantitative and qualitative research methods, GIS, data visualization, data analysis, oral and written communication skills, housing finance, real estate development, and others.
Syllabus

Past Courses

PLAN 52 – Race, Sex and Place in America

This course is intended to introduce students to issues related to race, ethnicity and gender and their relationship to physical space.  The course will explore how various ‘identities’ are socially constructed and how these social constructions shape urban space. In addition, students will be exposed to a diversity of contemporary issues that highlight the intersection between race, ethnicity, gender and place.  The course will also provide opportunities for first year students to acquire or improve skills in research methods, active learning, self-directed inquiry, communications skills (oral and written), and group collaboration.
Syllabus

PLAN 663 – Diversity & Inequality in Cities

This course is intended to introduce students in planning to issues related to diversity and inequality. Different aspects of diversity (e.g. gender, class, race, ethnicity, sexuality, nationality/citizenship, etc) will be explored in order to raise awareness about various ‘identities’ that are found in cities and how these identities shape individuals’ understanding of their social world and the views they may have on planning and policy issues. Students will pay particular attention to the political/social construction of individual/group identities and how the political/social construction of identities has shaped our planning practices and policy formations. In addition, students will gain skills in program evaluation, questionnaire development, survey implementation, data analysis, and working with minority communities by examining the Crest Street Relocation Program. The Crest Street case is an example of how intergovernmental collaboration and community mobilization can create more physically and socially vibrant minority communities.
Syllabus

PLAN 704 – Planning Theory

This course will introduce first year Master’s of City & Regional Planning students to the fundamental theories relevant to the field of city and regional planning that provide insight into the contemporary dilemmas, challenges, and planning possibilities within the profession. Students are expected to become familiar with core theories within the discipline and contrast how different theories have the potential to address key planning and policy issues. Students will be able to identify how theory guides (or fails to guide) planning practice and research.
Syllabus

PLAN 764 – CDR Techniques

Researchers in the humanities and the social sciences tend to study public policy from different perspectives. In this class, we will examine public policy from the perspective of two disciplines: rhetoric and city and regional planning. Rhetoric scholars focus on the language stakeholders use to frame discussions of public policy, while planning researchers use methods such as
interviews, case studies, and site visits to understand policy changes and how they affect individuals. By combining these methods, students in this course will develop a deeper understanding of public policy, understand how persuasive language shapes our understanding of those policies, and learn how to craft effective messages to enact change.
Syllabus